Match-Cut

A “match-cut” in cinema refers to the linking of two separate moments in time via the continuation of some element present in both. This can refer to a composition, subject, image, or action that starts in one instance, and ends in another. This type of cut, in both the context of cinema, and in comics, is used to draw a relationship between both contexts.

In this page of Hawkeye we can see the change in context, and even location, but continuity of Hawkeye's head position and composition. Source: Aja, David. Fraction, Matt. (2012, September). Hawkeye (1).
Figure 1. In this page of Hawkeye we can see the change in context, and even location, but continuity of Hawkeye’s head position and composition. Source: Aja, David. Fraction, Matt. (2012, September). Hawkeye (1).

[Reference the examples by figure name. Also, try to provide a bit more context for your examples. This is especially important when  you’re talking about influential works such as Hawkeye and Killing Joke.] As it appears in this page of Hawkeye, the use of a match-cut transitions Clint from his predicament in a bar fight to his later state of being asleep at the veterinarian. In this instance the match-cut reaffirms this Hawkeye issue’s of sense of skipped time as Clint Barton’s story is told from past to present. The match-cut also removes the unnecessary story-telling that happens in between moments, giving a sense of past paced memories being played.

A match-cut is used to assert the Joker's current self, in direct comparison with his former, sane, identity. Source: Moore, A., & Bolland, B. (2008). Batman: The Killing Joke (Deluxe ed.). New York: DC Comics.
Figure 2. A match-cut is used to assert the Joker’s current self, in direct comparison with his former, sane, identity. Source: Moore, A., & Bolland, B. (2008). Batman: The Killing Joke (Deluxe ed.). New York: DC Comics.

In The Killing Joke match-cuts are used [by zombies] multiple times to draw parallels between the Joker’s former identify, and his current. The context difference between the two highlights his current state of isolation versus his former, slightly social location. The color changes, but continuous use of the hat and hand position draw a relationship between what has changed (his sanity,  appearance, and whimsical attitude), and the pervasive elements like drink.

This scene depicts the match-cut between Wiccan's suicidal action and Loki's divine entrance. Gillen, Kieron. McKelvie, Jamie. (2013). Young Avengers: Omnibus. Marvel Comics
Figure 3. This scene depicts the match-cut between Wiccan’s suicidal action and Loki’s divine entrance. Source: Gillen, Kieron. McKelvie, Jamie. (2013). Young Avengers: Omnibus. Marvel Comics

Young Avengers uses this match-cut to establish a more abstract relationship based on the readers interpretation of what will happen next. The gun Wiccan holds to his chin points upwards, as a viewer we predict the plasma will exit the top of his head. In line with our belief the jump cut utilizes the same directional composition, and the reader, to produce Loki’s entrance into the scene.

Match-cuts establish the change in context, or similarity between subjects in only two frames. As the interact with the reader they also require a significant amount of participation in understanding what the panels portray. [Please fold in two examples from sources other than the course readings.]

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